Rose Panna Cotta with Berries

What does pink taste like? Flutters of childhood innocence like roaming a rose garden. To savor a bit of pink’s wonderful qualities, try The Taste Curators‘ Rose Panna Cotta with Berries recipe.

The impact of color is so profound that it’s been said that it influences 85% of our purchasing decisions. When you really think about it, this is as true when picking out the freshest bunch of basil as it is when choosing a new hat or new wallpaper. If we open ourselves up to it and acknowledge its power, color makes for impactful experiences.

Rose Panna Cotta with Berries Recipe

For the Panna Cotta:
Cooking spray
3 cups half-and-half
1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/3 cup sugar
1/4 tsp kosher salt
2 tsp rose water

For the Topping:
1 cup strawberries, quartered
1 cup raspberries
2 tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp lemon zest from 1/2 a lemon
Pinch of kosher salt

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Grease the inside of 6 (4 oz) ramekins with cooking spray. Wipe out any excess with a paper towel, leaving a light coating of oil.
  2. Pour the half-and-half into a small saucepan. Sprinkle the gelatin over the top and allow it to sit until the gelatin looks wet, about 5 minutes.
  3. Place the saucepan over medium heat. Add the sugar and salt. Whisk to combine. Bring to just below a simmer, stirring often with a rubber spatula to dissolve the sugar, about 5 minutes. Stir in the rose water. Pour the mixture into the prepared ramekins and refrigerate for at least 6 hours or overnight.
  4. To serve, combine both berries, the sugar, lemon zest, and salt in a medium bowl. Mix everything together and toss well to coat. Allow the berries to macerate at room temperature for 5 minutes, or overnight in the refrigerator, to allow the flavors to marry. Run a thin knife around the edge of each ramekin and invert each panna cotta onto small serving plates. Top with a spoonful of berries and serve immediately.

Cook’s note: If the panna cotta is sticking, submerge the bottom of each ramekin in warm water for 30 seconds at a time and try to invert it again. Continue to do this until it slides out easily.

Story and Styling by The Taste Curators / Recipe courtesy of Lish Steiling, The Taste Curators / Photography by Lauren Volo

A footer photo with a black background and subscribe info and button

Subscribe to TABLE Magazine’s print edition.

SUBSCRIBE TO TABLE TALK

Choose your region

We respect your privacy.

spot_img

Related Articles

Who Says Girl Dinner is Just for Girls?

The trend everybody loved to hate.

The Origins of the Strawberry

Our story starts in early 1700s Chile. With espionage...

Chef Paul Smith is West Virginia’s First James Beard Award Winner

"I'm just so happy to be giving West Virginia something to cheer for."